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  • 10 Nov 2011 8:45 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Blog by Brenda Tillmann

    It’s important to remember that when you meet someone for the first time, you have an opportunity to make a real connection, or you can simply pass on your name and be forgotten. Successful relationship-building requires more than just handing out business cards. To build long-lasting, solid and mutually-beneficial relationships, a little homework and a little thoughtfulness goes a long way. Here are my tips for making a powerful impression that brings lasting results.

    Do Your Homework - Research the People You’re Meeting

    If you’re meeting someone in particular, research the person or people you’re meeting. Lots of resources exist that can give you both professional and personal reference material. The Web is a source of unlimited information, with things like company websites, personal bios, work histories, resumes, and portfolios; depending on who you’re meeting, you may be able to find a wide range of information about your contact. If the Web doesn’t produce any useful information, you could check with the company where your contact works, to see if they have any marketing information containing professional info about your contact. You could also check your local library for periodicals, such as magazine stories, newspaper articles or professional interviews. Depending on how public the person is that you’re meeting, you may be able to find everything from the name of a spouse to the first place they worked after college. Use the information you find when you meet your contact. Talk about common interests, such as being a parent, alma mater, hobbies; whatever common bond you can form with your contact can help you form a good relationship. Ask about things near and dear to the person’s heart – not just business talk – and you’re well on your way to forming a real connection.

    Show Genuine Interest by Asking Questions
    Getting to know people to form real connections is an art that can easily be mastered.  Ask questions about everything; not just their professional life, but their personal interests and family life, too. The more you show that you’re genuinely interested in them and  understand, know and really “get” the person, the better your relationship will be, and the more business opportunities you’re likely to gain. Be a real person to your connections, too – if your new business partner volunteer’s information about their spouse then open up and talk about your spouse. The more personal you can make your relationships with people, the better your long-term success with those relationships will be.

    You Must Be Sincere

    Everyone can have fun building good relationships – all you have to do is be genuinely interested in people. Enjoy getting to know your business colleagues, or even the person you met in the coffee line today. Forming connections with people can help in all aspects of your life, and even random connections can help your business in unexpected ways. You never know when someone will refer a key contact; an affiliate who may have great products for your prospects, or a business associate that could make your product a high-demand success!
    Remember what your mother taught you as a child, to have friends you must be a friend.  Don’t just see people as stepping stones to a better business. Take the time and make the effort to form real, legitimate connections by getting to know people, and I promise good business will follow naturally. 

    Brenda Tillmann specializes in helping entrepreneurs attract idea clients and close more sales in less time with her customized programs SMART Marketing TM and Sell by Not Selling TM. If you want to get clients calling you instead of you chasing them, sign up at http://www.BrendaTillmann.com.
  • 07 Nov 2011 8:44 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Blog by: Liane Caruso of Limelight Marketing Consultants

    Women entrepreneurs are truly fabulous. We commit ourselves to owning a business, diving in head first and sharing our business dreams with anyone who will listen. One of our biggest strengths is one of our biggest weaknesses, and as women entrepreneurs, we overcommit!  We naturally take on too much, wear way too many hats and can quickly become overwhelmed. And before you know it, we can easily – without intention – set ourselves up for failure.  One way to avoid that is have a solid, strategic marketing plan in place. Haven’t you ever heard “He who fails to plan, plans to fail?” Ladies, we love planning parties, dinners and events, so let’s plan for our business!
     
    Many new business owners don’t take the time to create a plan because the plan in itself is overwhelming.  But, without a plan, how do you know where you’re going or where you’ve been? Have you laid out a budget? Who is going to help you execute your plan? How can you tell if your efforts are successful or where are the budget pitfalls? The purpose of the marketing plan is to define your market, identify your customers and competitors, determine your strengths and weaknesses, outline a strategy for attracting and keeping customers, and to identify and anticipate change.
     
    Knowing your customers is the cornerstone to your success. If you don’t know their likes, dislikes or expectations how do you assume to fulfill their need? If you’re marketing to the wrong target market, you’re wasting a lot of time, energy and hard-earned money.  Also, make sure you have identified your competition including their strengths and weaknesses. How and what are their marketing efforts? What is successful for them?
     
    Set your goals and objectives. This is like a big To Do list for your company. What woman doesn’t love a To Do list? Be bold! If you want to be a 3-million dollar company in three years, why not set that expectation for yourself and your company? Mary Kay Ash, one of the most successful women in business said, “Shoot for the moon and you’ll land among the stars.”
     
    Establish a budget. “What should my marketing budget look like?” You have to spend money to make money.  However, there are MANY cost-effective marketing options out there to explore so make sure you’re weighing your options and getting multiple quotes.
     
    Basically, without a well thought out plan, you will be reacting, which could lead to additional spending that is not aligned strategically with your sales objectives and goals for the year. Give yourself a couple of months to create the plan and it does not have to be set in stone. Your company and marketplace will evolve and your plan should too. It’s a living, breathing document that will help guide your day-to-day activities.
     
    Need help? There are consultants out there who can help you create a strategic marketing plan for your business. One comes to mind that I’m particularly fond of: Limelight Marketing Consultants. Call or email anytime with questions to liane@limelightconsultants.com or (813) 388-9384.
  • 11 Oct 2011 8:44 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Blog by Patricia Rossi

    I am frequently asked by people who find themselves uncomfortable in social networking situations, “What can I do to become more relaxed?” Many people,not just those  who consider themselves an introvert or shy, find it difficult to communicate with people they don’t know very well.  As a result, they may find they lose out on business opportunities.

    Keep in mind, people like to do business with someone they know and feel they can trust. So, the next time you are heading to a social networking event, see it as an opportunity to make new friends and this will naturally turn into new business contacts.

    Following are a few tips to improve your networking experience:

    • Practice conversation. Wherever you go, see it as an opportunity to practice conversing with people you don’t know – the grocery store, coffee shop, bus stop, gym, doctor’s office, or spouse’s family functions. If you see someone idle, strike up a conversation. What’s the worst that could happen? Every opportunity gives you a chance to reflect and then build upon the next experience, making it easier each time.
    • Wear a smile. Just keeping a smile on your face gives others the overall impression that you are a positive person. If you only maintain a blank stare, people will write you off pretty quickly. You only get one chance to make a first impression, and your expression may be the first thing people notice.
    • Remember names and faces. All too often people say they forget someone’s name immediately after an introduction. Make a point of paying attention at introductions and remembering the person’s name. Equally important is to remember the face that goes with the name. This makes a person feel important and they will have a positive reaction toward you as well.
    • Ask questions. If you don’t know what to talk about with someone, ask something you would like to know about the person. Ask them about their hobbies, what they like to read, something about the meeting, where they got their designer shoes that you just love and have to have. People like to talk about themselves, so you can take the focus off of your own uneasiness and put it on what you would like to know about the other person.
    • Listen, listen, and listen some more. Often times we are focused on what we should say next and we are not really listening to what the other person is saying. Make direct eye contact with the person you are speaking with and listen carefully to what is being said, then the conversation will flow easily. It won’t take long before you and this person who was a stranger only a moment ago now feels like a new friend.
    • All of the above suggestions are things you can and should practice in public settings. Then, the next time you go to a networking event, you will be much more comfortable with making conversation, making new friends, and ultimately developing great business contacts.

    Wishing you much happiness and success!

    Patricia Rossi, America’s Etiquette and Protocol Coach, www.patriciarossi.com
  • 28 Sep 2011 8:43 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Blog by Leah Turner of Turner Time Consulting

    OK, I must admit, Time Management is not the most exciting topic to discuss in a blog. We are all adults, and basically we should know how to manage our time, right? We all know about the Stephen Covey - Franklin Quest systems. And we all know that if we don’t manage our time, our time will manage us, blah, blah, blah. So, what the heck am I doing writing a blog about boring old time management? Well, I want to change the way we look at time management and make it Sexy, Fun, and Exciting!! Impossible, you say? Well, give me a moment of your precious TIME and let’s see if I can change your mind!

    When I left the comforts of the corporate world several years ago to start my own business, I had to make a shift in the way I looked at and managed my time. I used to do exactly what we are all told to do; I would make a list of everything I needed to do, prioritize that list, and then schedule each task into my day. Once a task was complete, I happily CHECKED it off the list and moved on to the next item.

    Efficient, but boring! So, when I started my own business, I realized this system just wasn’t working for me. Why not, you ask? Well, when you own your own business the phrase ‘Time is MONEY’ takes on a whole new meaning!

    You see, it is not so much about completing a specific task in order to check it off your list as it is about building your business, your referral base, and your revenues.  Here are three time management tips:

    1. ASSIGN A DOLLAR VALUE TO YOUR TIME: This was probably the single most important step I made in my new sexy, fun, exciting Time Management program.  Let me explain….let’s say you want to gross $100,000 in one year. That breaks down to $8,333 per month, or $2083 per week (based on a 40 hour work week), or $52.08 per hour.

    So, basically, every hour during your workday is worth $52.08. So, how is that best utilized? Is meeting with a vendor you KNOW you are never going to use worth your time or would that time be better spent asking them to send you over their information via e-mail? Do you really need to have that 45 phone conversation with your friend at 3 pm in the afternoon? (Not unless he or she is paying you for it!). Is it really worth your $52.08 per hour to attend that workshop, luncheon or event?

    I have several realtor clients, and it is amazing what happens to them once they ‘get’ this concept. No longer are they spending seventeen hours schlepping potential buyers to 35 properties on a weekend! They do a much better job of pre-qualifying and determining their clients’ needs before they waste their precious time (and gas!) driving them across the city!

    2. NO LONGER DO THOSE THINGS WHICH DO NOT BENEFIT MY BOTTOM LINE: It’s ALL about the ROI (return on investment), baby!  I am a firm believer in networking, but I am a firmer believer in ROI. Take a look at your networking schedule. If you client base is new home builders, how much sense does it make to network with a group that has no builder members? None. Or, let’s say your job or business requires you to conduct or attend a lot of meetings and there is NO WAY you can avoid it. Make sure those meetings are productive. Set an agenda. Do you really need to waste the first thrity minutes of a meeting talking about who got booted off  ‘Dancing with the Stars’?

    3.  SCHEDULE TIME FOR YOU: Just as it is important for you to schedule your money-making activities, it is equally important for you to schedule your personal time. And, I promise you this, once you have put steps 1 and 2 into place, you will be amazed at the amount of additional time you will find in your day! Make  that a priority as well. After all, YOU deserve it!

    People, there are never going to be more than twenty-four hours in a day. So, it is critical that you make the best use of your time in a way that is going to be profitable and productive to you! Look at managing your time the same way you look at planning a vacation! You do the upfront research, you plan the activities you want to do, and then you DO IT and have a great time! Remember, time flies when your having fun!

    Founded by Leah Turner, Turner Time Consulting offers marketing services, business coaching and company training programs. Turner Time Consulting partners with businesses and individuals to create a 'blue print' for professional success, and then we provide the solutions to get you there.

    info@TurnerTimeConsulting.com
    (407) 709-6816
    http://turnertimeconsulting.com
  • 14 Sep 2011 5:39 PM | Working Women (Administrator)

    The Votes are In: Tampa Bay Networking Group is Number One

    Tampa, FL September 7, 2011: Despite competition from some of the largest and most well- established professional networking organizations, Working Women of Tampa Bay took the top spots in the Best Leads Group and the Best Networking Event in the Best in the Biz Awards sponsored by the Tampa Bay Business Journal.

    With nominations spanning a seven-county area, over sixty categories and 750 businesses; TBBJ’s Readers’ Choice Awards attracted almost 6,000 people who cast their votes for the organizations that are the most effective in developing and supporting business-to-business relationships.

    As the fastest growing network of women in the bay area, Working Women of Tampa Bay (WWOTB) just celebrated their two year anniversary in June and is 600+ members and 10,000 social media fans strong. Their goal is to help educate, motivate and inspire female professionals and women business owners.

    WWOTB has accomplished these objectives with a unique blend of contemporary and traditional networking techniques that inspire and genuinely unite their members. According to founder Jessica Rivelli, “Working Women has a solid place in the economic recovery as more women make the effort to start their own enterprises, build relationships and start strategic sponsorships. A lot of women have taken that challenge, and I believe women entrepreneurs are going to shape the new economy.”

    Hosted in a variety of Tampa Bay venues, WWOTB’s eclectic events calendar includes workshops and wine tastings, spa trips and museum visits, as well as two monthly power luncheons that feature presentations by renowned speakers and offer plenty of open networking time.

    Throughout the year, members are given the opportunity to sponsor events and donate products and services for contribution to charitable causes.

    The cost of joining WWOTB is $50 for a half-year membership or $90 for a full year. For additional information visit the website or email workingwomenoftampabay@gmail.com.

    ###

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

  • 07 Sep 2011 11:34 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Taking Care of a Senior Dog
    Jennifer Fadal
    Pet Wellness & Lifestyle Expert


    You know the old saying that one human year equals seven dog years!  So, if your dog is seven years old…his body is really more like that of a 49 year old human.  What should you expect as your dog ages?  How can you better care for him so he is comfortable, pain free and happy?  

    Many people ask:  When is my dog considered old?  A good rule of thumb is to bring this discussion to the forefront when your dog is approaching his seventh year.  Keep in mind however that smaller breeds are considered adult dogs for a few more years since they typically have a longer life span.  

    A seven year old Great Dane is definitely considered a senior dog whereas a seven year old Maltese is hardly that.  Discuss your dog’s age with your vet especially if you begin to notice signs of aging.  

    Signs of aging:  Hearing loss, greying around the muzzle, decrease in appetite, blueish or cloudy look to the eyes, hair loss, decrease in energy level and an increase in water intake.

    Small lifestyle changes can make your senior pooch more comfortable.  

    Bedding: Senior dogs really like their zzz’s so a clean comfortable bed is a must.  There are many varieties of orthopedic beds out there that will take pressure off of sore muscles, joints and ligaments.  

    Food: A slight shift in dog food may be helpful as well.  If your dog has become less active, try a senior formula that offers a bit less fat and protein but more glucosamine.  The latter serves as an anti-inflammatory and can promote joint health and manage arthritic pain.  

    Supplements:  Speaking of glucosamine and chondroitin.  Try adding a supplement to your pet’s daily diet to further relieve the effects of aging joints.  Glucosamine and Chondroitin can help to reduce inflammation, therefore reducing stiffness and pain. Fish oil is also a great supplement to add.  It aids with skin and coat and is an anti-inflammatory.

    Toys- Opt for toys that are a bit softer.  As your dog ages his teeth can become more sensitive.   A softer toy will still give him a ton of fun but will be gentler on his mouth.

    Coat- Keep him clean.  Some of my clients say that their senior dog seems more smelly.  Opt for an in between bath spritz that will keep him smelling fresh!

    Fresh water-  Other recommendations are to always have fresh water for your senior.   

    Manage your expectations of what they can do physically and make sure they don’t over exert.  Especially in hot weather, monitor their outdoor activity closely.

    Senior dogs have a lot of love to give.  And if you are considering adopting a dog, you just might want to think about a dog that has a few years under their belt.  As you look into those soulful eyes, just think, potty training is taken care of, they know their manners indoor and out and they are more than happy to have you cuddle up with them for a nap!  



    © Jennifer Fadal, Jenn Fadal is a Pet Wellness & Lifestyle Expert.  She is a frequent contributor to the South Tampa Community News, BellaDOG magazine, Pet Product News International as well as other area and industry wide publications.  Jenn is the pet correspondent for Daytime, a syndicated lifestyle show on NBC and the pet correspondent for Better TV, a syndicated lifestyle show part of the Meredith network. She can also be heard on Martha Stewart Living Radio.  Jennifer owns Wag Natural Pet Market on Davis Islands and can be reached at jennfadal@yahoo.com or www.jennfadal.com.

  • 18 Aug 2011 5:00 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    If You Are Not a Runner
    Debbie Voiles deb@debbievoiles.com

    “I’m not a runner. I’d like to be, but I can’t run.”

    I get that a lot, and this, too:
    “I run a little bit, but I mostly walk; I’m not a runner.” They say that with great emphasis on the word “not,” and always follow it with an apologetic laugh.

    I remember when I was eight. The 6th graders at the bus stop seemed like grown-ups. I couldn’t imagine ever being that big, or that old, but I did get that big and that old.  Yet, it didn’t seem big or old when I got there.

    It’s that way with running. It’s all about perspective. Where you will go and what you can achieve is based largely on where you have been and what you have done. You won’t believe you can do a 5k until you have run a mile, and that is the secret to becoming a runner.  You have to start where you are today. If you are not a runner, then simply making the decision to become one is enough. The single, biggest obstacle is the mental one, believing.

    You will find it surprisingly doable if you start with only slightly more activity than what you’re doing right now. That’s Day 1 of my Very Easy, Very Gradual Beginning Running Program. Tomorrow, you will walk a mile, but every two minutes, you will run 10 steps, and that’s all the running you’ll do. In fact, that’s all the running you’ll do for each workout the first week. Then, we only bump it up to 15 steps of running at a time for the next week. This gradual progression gives your body time to adapt to your new activity level and your mind time to grasp your new identity, that of a runner.

    That’s right, on Day 3, you will wake up a runner. You will have already completed two days of the program and now it is time to start adjusting your self-concept. You can no longer repeat the “I’m not a runner” mantra. You will have completed the hardest part, making the commitment and getting started. After that, count on the sweet sensation of accomplishment to keep you going.
    When I was growing up, I dreaded the day we did the 600 yard walk/run in school. It was always a disaster for me. That’s less than half a mile, but although I was athletic, I felt crippled any time I tried to run more than a quarter mile.

    When I was in my twenties, my grandfather told me, “If you pick up a calf every day from the day it’s born, when it’s a cow, you’ll still be able to pick it up.” I’m not sure if that’s really possible (probably not) but I understood his point.

    Many years after those miserable days at P.E., with much more wisdom and 20 pounds to lose, I tried running again, but this time I did it my way. I started with just a little bit of running mixed with much more walking and over time increased the running while decreasing the walking. Turns out that was the secret. That was 34 years and over 200 races ago.

    What do you say? Today can be your Day 1.

    There’s no shame in baby steps, but standing still won’t get you anywhere.

  • 05 Aug 2011 12:35 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Interviewing &  Dating
    By Fleming Ford, President, SHOREforce

    So many times my clients are surprised and frustrated with a candidate that turns down a job offer.  After going through the expense and multiple, disappointing interviews, they are so thrilled to have found “THE ONE”.  So you can imagine they are simply shocked and even a little glum when the candidate declines the offer. This is when we talk about the rules of dating.

    Now for some of you it may have been a while since you last experienced the dating scene and for others it may have been as recent as last night. Regardless, the truth remains, “playing it cool” is a critical part of the dating process. How about the date that asked if we could meet his parents when we just dipped our spoon into dessert or the lovely “gentleman” that assumed we must want him to hit on us, just because we sat at the bar he was holding up.  Let’s face it, desperation is never attractive, coming on too soon or too strong is a game changer.  It’s possible, those guys may have been amazing, but we’ll never know because our personal alarm was shoutingundefined“He must be a loser to be so desperate--WARNING, WARNING, ESCAPE NOW!”

    Frequently, hiring managers have spent a lot of time and money to find a skilled, professional or simply a showered and sober candidate, so it is no surprise we can get a little over-excited to find a good one.  Dare I say it? WE too can come across as too desperate and so that our candidate thinks “WARNING, WARNING”.   They wonder, “Why is it so easy to get a job here?  Why do they want me so badly?”  So, my advice is to try “playing it cool”.   Be on time, be prepared, be interested, be friendly but most importantly, play a little hard to get, even if you have to fake it.  Remember, many Americans want what they can’t have (remember that guy that never looked your way??).

    So next time you find yourself getting excited that you have found “THE ONE”, play hard to get and make them work for it!  That’s right, bring them back for a 2nd interview, and a 3rd, tell them you have other good candidates and it’s critical you make the best decision, ask challenging interview questions, make them wonder if they are good enough and by all means do not offer them the job before dessert!


    Fleming Ford is the President of SHOREforce, which provides tools and training to Select, Hire, On-Board, Retain & Engage top talent. Give your managers the skills they need to build a top performance team.
  • 25 Jul 2011 9:28 PM | Working Women (Administrator)
    Want to stop procrastinating?
    by Kathy McDonald, productivity expert, business coach, author and speaker
    www.GetClearGetGoingCoaching.com

    Think of something on your to-do list that you “should” do, that has been on your list long enough it’s growing mold.    

    Give yourself permission not to do it.  Yep, channel your inner slacker.  

    Now pay attention to the feelings that show up next.  This is where it gets interesting.

    One of two things will happen:
    You’ll feel relief like my client Bridget*, who realized she was sweating over something that didn’t really need to get done.  If this is your case, enjoy the energy you just released that can be channeled towards something that matters more to you.  

    Or....

    You’ll feel resistance, like my client Margaret*.  She had been putting off getting another level of certification for her profession.  No matter what she tried, she couldn’t get into action.  “Great.  Don’t do it,” I prompted.  There was a long pause.  Then the discussion began.  She realized the certification was critical to her staying competitive in her field.  It meant the financial stability of her family.  We just uncovered the motivation she needed to get off the fence and get the certification done.

    What’s your motivation?

    Deciding not to do the project you’ve been avoiding will help uncover what matters enough to you to move forward.  You can always add a reward to sweeten the pot.  In addition, imagine what it will feel like to complete.  Feel that sense of relief and satisfaction in your belly and mind.  The energy you free up from completion with give you new drive to tackle the other things on your list.

    *Names are changed to protect client confidentiality.
  • 18 Jul 2011 11:51 AM | Working Women (Administrator)

    What’s the Real Scoop?

    By Chris Kuhn, Freelance Writer & Editor

    www.ckuhntampabay.com

    When you ask business owners to stand up and talk about themselves and their business, some have their 30-second commercial prepared and ready to roll off the tongue. For others, the phrase “deer in headlights” comes to mind. But what happens when those opportunities arise that can offer business owners a little more time, attention and exposure, such as speaking engagements, business profiles, or radio or TV interviews? As someone who frequently dons the “media hat,” I’m always fascinated to hear what entrepreneurs will focus on when telling about themselves and their products and services when given the chance to do so. They may think that they know the most compelling aspect of their biz “story” but do they really? Quite often, they don’t.

    So how do you determine what are the most compelling points of your story? There are several questions you can ask yourself to help guide you to the real story behind what you do.

    1. Why did you go into business?
      Is there a personal connection to what you’re doing? If it’s a cause, why is it so near and dear to your heart? If it involves a particular audience, what is it about this group that means so much to you? By sharing what inspired you to pursue your dream, you can inspire others, and inspiration is always compelling.
    2. What was your path like to get to where you are today?
      For some business owners, things seem to line up just perfectly but for others, there may be challenges to overcome and by sharing some of these with others, they not only gain an appreciation for your dedication but also for your fortitude and determination to beat the odds. Never underestimate the power of the underdog’s tale.
    3. What would most surprise an audience to learn about you or your business?
      As interesting as your business may be, sometimes it may be a characteristic, hobby or talent that a business owner has completely outside of what they do for a living, that will attract someone to the story. Perhaps you sell real estate for a niche market but it also turns out that you’ve won multiple triathlons. Or maybe you’re a financial planner who just so happens to have a real talent for art. In the process, we learn why you followed the professional path you did but see another side that may draw us to you as a business professional as well.
    4. What information about you or your business could benefit your audience?
      If you ask an inventor to talk about the most valuable part of their creation, you soon learn that what the innovator is most excited about isn’t always what the target market cares about. Yes, it has all of these bells and whistles, and isn’t that nice, but how does it help the customer? If however, you bring a marketer into the mix, he or she can quickly surmise that this new gadget will allow moms carpooling kids to speak their texts to friends by headset while they drive; or save them time preparing business proposals for clients with some automated voice-technology feature. We’re reminded that bells and whistles sound pretty but must know what value they offer to the customer. Stories work much the same way. Why do I want to hear from you? Is there some useful information – maybe from a personal story behind an idea or the outcome of a bad business decision – that I can learn from you? Interest me, yes, but educate me, too, and I’ll want to hear more.
    5. If you were reading a story about someone else, what would interest you enough to continue reading and can you draw parallels to these characteristics in your own life?
      We forget as we’re being storytellers that we ourselves are readers, too. No one likes to read a story they’ve heard before, yet each of us is a unique woman with very distinct experiences that have shaped who we are today. So what moves us? What compels us to go beyond that first paragraph and want to know more? As we consider what factors motivate us to read another’s story, we can take a closer look at our own life, examine our career path and ask honestly – if I were learning about how I reached where I am today, what experiences along the way and elements of my personal and professional background would make me click on “Read More”?


    Through our social media avenues, outside media outlets, speaking opportunities or even through our own marketing communications and website, we hold the key to telling the most compelling story about ourselves and our businesses. While we may not have control over how that story is told through certain channels such as traditional media or others’ blogs, we can take the reins each time we have the opportunity to share with others. The “real” story may not be what you anticipated at all, but may allow your customers and prospective clients to see a different side of you that is memorable, inspiring and a true lesson for us all.

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